About your Search

20121226
20130103
STATION
CSPAN 48
LANGUAGE
English 48
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)
and environmental friendliness. most data centers, by design, consume vast amounts of energy in an incongruously wasteful manner, interviews and documents show. >> that is right. we also point out that different plays in this industry behave differently. there is a range. we're talking about the typical data center. doing these digital tasks, everything from banks to big department stores -- the computers in these data centers typically are actually not doing anything but trying electricity, for the most part. most of the electricity -- the vast majority -- is powering a computer that is waiting for something to do. these things, once turned on -- we as consumers insist that this infrastructure always be available, and never run out of capacity. those computers are sitting there, just waiting for us to call upon them to do something. whether it is day or night, the dead of night when no one is asking for the service, or the middle of the day when everyone is, they're always on. it is a built-in way of operating in this industry. it has developed a lot of critics. >> you also write about their en
about america's energy, economy and environment. i'm greg dalton. in 1988, nasa scientist james hansen told a congressional hearing that it was 99% certain that burning fossil fuels was heating the earth's atmosphere. the next day, a new york times headline proclaimed, quote, global warming has begun, expert tells senate. a quarter century later, dr. hansen and other scientists are still striving to convince much of the united states that basic scientific observation -- seas are rising, glaciers are disappearing, floods are increasing. humans are the cause. about half of americans now accept that fact, 40% do not, according to gallup. over the next hour, we will discuss climate science communication, public policy and opinion, with james hansen and our live audience here at the commonwealth club of california in san francisco. today, dr. hansen is receiving the 2012 stephen schneider award for outstanding climate science communication bestowed by climate one. stephen schneider was a pioneering scientist at stanford who was involved in the formation of climate one that which is a sustai
as to develop the unconventional fossil fuels because they're dirtier, you get less energy per unit carbon and you get all these other pollution, regional pollution. so we need to try to talk common sense into them and we've -- you know, we've done -- i've been arrested in the front of the white house because of the tar sands. and there are more and more people who are willing to stand up and protest against those. and i know i sound like a broken record, but just -- and i've realized that just trying to block an individual carbon source, although that's meritorious, it won't work if we don't have a price on carbon. >> yeah. and china will just -- all right. we're gonna invite your participation and, particularly, if you haven't had a chance to ask a question. and i'm gonna be assertive about -- i'm encouraging you to be brief and get to your question so we can get as many people to participate as possible. the line starts with our producer jane ann right there, and then i welcome your comments for dr. hansen. let's invite the audience participation. yes, welcome to climate one. >> thank y
energy companies that are creating jobs, it would extend unemployment insurance to 2 million americans who are actively looking for jobs out there. i have to say that ever since i took office, throughout the campaign, and over the last couple of months, my preference would have been to solve all these problems in the context of a larger agreement, a bigger deal, a grand bargain or whatever you want to call it, that solves the deficit problems in a balanced and responsible way that does not just deal with taxes but also spending so that we can put all this behind us and focus on growing our economy. with this congress, that was obviously too much to hope for at this time. [laughter] maybe we can do it in stages. we will solve this problem instead in several steps. in 2011, we started reducing the deficit through $1 trillion in spending cuts which have taken place. the agreement being worked on right now would further reduce the deficit by asking the wealthiest 2% of americans to pay higher taxes for the first time in two decades so that would add additional hundreds of billions of dolla
won, a conversation about climate energy. burning fossil fuels release [indiscernible] they accepted the the fundamentals of climates science. today, things are different. skeptics are winning the comic communication battle even as temperatures rise and the intensity increases worldwide. over the next hour, we will talk about high school physics and chemistry and how science has committed in the public realm. we are joined by three distinguished scientists. michael mann is the author of "hockey and the current war." and a student from stanford university. >> i should mention that bill is here on very short notice. thank you for stepping in on such short notice you published the seminal work study on the hockey stick. tell us what the hockey stick is. >> it is not a sport. it is a curve that my co- authors and i published a few years ago. we had eight century of widespread thermometers around the world. we had to turn to what we call proxy data. it is to piece together how the clement buried in the more distant past. while it was relatively warm about a thousand years ago, the recent
in emissions. if there are more people on the planet burning carbon for energy, we will be adding more carbon to the atmosphere. on the other hand, people who are living in a western-style exist then use a lot more energy than people in the developing world. one of the terms in the product of terms from which we deduce future carbon emissions is global population. we tend to believe the global population will stabilize with 10 billion people by the middle of the century because the developing world will take on some of the characteristics of the western world in terms of their rate of production, for example. when you look at some of those projections, built into many of them is the assumption that the global population will eventually stabilize. if it does not do that, it means that the problem is even worse. that is the key uncertainty, the wild card. >> the bottom-line is a really nice where people are in the world, but how many people want a u.s. lifestyle. >> thomas rÜgen talks about an america that has 3 billion people. >> my name is wayne rauf. it is -- wayne rth. what will it take to
. to some extent, we have gained economically through dirt cheap excess of energy. but it will be costly down the road. we still have time to avert a future where we leave our children and grandchildren a degraded planet, but there's not a whole lot of time. >> basically-judges has been -- basically, our idea has been let's make our children richer and they can figure it out here [laughter] my daughters may live to the end of this century. what are they looking at? >> there is still time to prevent -- most scientists classify it as what would constitute a very dangerous impact on the plan met -- on the planet. we can prevent that. we would have to prevent sued to concentration -- would have to prevent co2 concentration. next year, if we were sitting in this room, rudi 397. -- they would be about 397. you can get to 450 pretty soon if we do not make some dramatic changes. if you do the math -- my good friend has going around the country with the do the math tour. we can still prevent dangerous impacts on our climate. but we have to bring our fossil fuel emissions to repeat within a matter
on the mileage stickers on cars. it improves our energy efficiency. that's a good thing. that is spurring growth. but the kind of reforms we have on wall street have not solved the problem. look at what happened last week's at usb, not only wild and irresponsible behavior, but then we have attorney general holder determining that he general holderubs the fullest -- attorney general holders a betty cannot prosecute ubs because he is afraid ubs is too big to shut down and would destroy financial markets. i thought dodd-frank was supposed to fix that. what was so disconcerting was the democrats did not join senator grassley in their u.n outcry about that protect the integrity of financial markets. it is something that should be bipartisan. but it is not, apparently. that is an example of regulation cannot afford. not all it is it is expensive, it's keeping people from getting loans, and it is impeding economic growth, which we need to pay for that column i talked about. host: on twitter -- guest: it is not. it is something people gravitate to because they use a rhetorical device to say there's a wa
extend tax credits for clean energy companies that are creating jobs, it would extend unemployment insurance to 2 million americans who are actively looking for jobs out there. i have to say that ever since i took office, throughout the campaign, and over the last couple of months, my preference would have been to solve all these problems in the context of a larger agreement, a bigger deal, a grand bargain or whatever you want to call it, that solves the deficit problems in a balanced and responsible way that does not just deal with taxes but also spending so that we can put all this behind us and focus on growing our economy. with this congress, that was obviously too much to hope for at this time. [laughter] maybe we can do it in stages. we will solve this problem instead in several steps. in 2011, we started reducing the deficit through $1 trillion in spending cuts which have taken place. the agreement being worked on right now would further reduce the deficit by asking the wealthiest 2% of americans to pay higher taxes for the first time in two decades so that would add additio
such as the research and development credit, and also, renewable energy incentives that must continue in this great country of ours. and bonus depreciation to encourage business investments. i want to emphasize this somewhat with in contrast to what our chairman has said. this legislation breaks the iron barrier that for far too long has prevented additional tax revenues from the very wealthiest. it raises $620 billion in revenue. achieving the president's goal of asking the wealthiest 2% of americans to pay more while protecting 98% of families. that is what it does. 97% -- i want to emphasize this, contrary to propaganda from the other side, 97% of a small business is protected from any tax increase. this needs to be emphasized, especially in view of your comments. this package is vital for future deficit-reduction efforts. setting the stage for a balanced approach from here on out. delaying sequestration. yesterday, president obama again said he is committed to deficit reduction. but he emphasized several times, and i " "we have got to do this in a balanced, responsible way, with additional reve
of the granite state citizens have and a lot of people of talent and energy. we need everybody to participate. if that is how we can proceed, i think we will be better off two years from now. >> i would echo that. my ultimate goal is equal opportunity for all and part of that is general -- is gender- related. i want to give out a shout out to private employers who can do better. i was very fortunate to work part time. most people did not know that. i worked four days a week. how was the first part time law partner in the state and my colleagues -- i was the first part time law partner in the state and my colleagues were great. the had to lock myself in a closet for a conference call. my kids were out playing. and the client asked for their children there? yes, my office is next to that christian school. that was true. i just was not in the office at the time. [laughter] but now we are more open about it. we all need to take responsibility. even as i am negotiating with my staff, you can get really great talent if you give them a little bit of flexibility. just let them pick up that 5:15. they
of renewable energy. these things are some of the changes in environmental law relative to emissions -- they are all part of that effort. we have got to do more. we have to build on that. but it is certainly a commitment. one thing we recognize is that it does not have to be a competition between our economy and our health, because renewable energy and clean energy have economic benefits that are pronounced, and people understand that. so we highlighted the issues we felt needed to be highlighted for voters who are going to make the decision in the election, but the president's agenda is reflected in his work, and i expect he will continue to work hard on this issue is. questions as we wrap this up. >> thanks for coming back to the university of chicago. i have a quick follow up. regarding super pac's -- you just now reclaim your concerns about unlimited money in campaign financing. on the other hand, we saw earlier today had democrats were already oiling up their machines for 2014 and 2016. what are the prospects for repealing citizens united or comprehensive campaign financing refo
a big big portion of the problem. thank you. host: what energy end of the year energy issues are we looking at here and which ones are likely to get punted down the road? guest: that's a good question. i'm not sure what energy issues -- i'm not aware of any -- host: tax issues? guest: tax issues for the fiscal cliff. but going down the road you definitely have some issues. there's the need for a new highway bill, they've had trouble tasking the highway legislation because no one is willing to increase the gas tax. and our gas taxes are the main ways we pay for new roads and bridges and that kind of thing. so i think that's a relatively short-term problem. and then over the long term, which i've talked about here before, is that given that we're going to need some rev now help solve our future fiscal burden, one of the most sensible places to raise revenue would be through a carbon tax or something similar because that can also help us reorient our energy priorities to cleaner, less damaging greenhouse gases type of energy. host: i want to note that you can go to the c-span fiscal cl
the energy airforce base. during the reagan administration, a great big commission that sounfound a soln for social security, these were big public fora where discussions were held with the public and now everything seems to be happening behind closed doors. why could openness happened in years past and today we can seem to get to deal? >> in large measure because the media has so changed. in those days, you did not have 24-hour coverage. what you find with 24-hour coverage if an idea services, at 10:00 a.m., it is dead by 2:00 p.m. because everybody goes to the cameras. the cameras are there. ever-present and wine to -- wanting to hype something. before you debate it is dead. you really see that around here. >> there has been a fair bit of criticism of the president for not embracing the findings of that commission. what is your take? >> i advised the president not to embrace the specifics because i feared if he did, house republicans would automatically be in opposition. if you are part of the commission you saw that dynamic. there were 18 of us. six representing the president, six rep
commissions or other groups, you mentioned the energy air force base. during the reagan administration, a great big commission that found a solution for social security, these were big public fora where discussions were held with the public and now everything seems to be happening behind closed doors. why could openness happened in years past and today we can not seem to get to deal? >> in large measure because the media has so changed. in those days, you did not have 24-hour coverage. what you find with 24-hour coverage if an idea services, at -- surfaces, at 10:00 a.m., it is dead by 2:00 p.m. because everybody goes to the cameras. the cameras are there. ever-present and wanting to hype something. before you debate it is dead. you really see that around here. >> there has been a fair bit of criticism of the president for not embracing the findings of that commission. what is your take? >> i advised the president not to embrace the specifics because i feared if he did, house republicans would automatically be in opposition. if you are part of the bowles- simpson commission you saw
and investments they make and the clean energy jobs they create. 2 million americans out of work that are out there looking every day will continue to receive unemployment benefits as long as they are actively looking for job. but i think we all recognize this lot is just one step in the broader effort to strengthen our economy and brought an opportunity for everybody. -- this law. the fact is the deficit is still too high. we are still investing too little in the things that we need for the economy to grow as fast as it should. that is why speaker john boehner and i originally tried to negotiate a larger agreement that would put the country on a path to paying down its debt while also putting americans back to work, rebuilding roads and bridges for, and providing investments in areas like education and job-training. unfortunately, there just was not enough support or time for that kind of large agreement in a lame-duck session of congress. that failure comes with a cost as the mess in nature of the process over the last several weeks has made business more uncertain and consumers less confid
want to switch topics. he has also been a big step in of energy policy -- champion of energy policy. discovery of natural gas in your state has changed the economy. where do you think this new discovery of this resource is going to lead us? >> i did it is incredibly positive for the united states. we of gone from 60% foreign energy dependence down to 40%. there are a lot of projections now the we could become energy independent over the next several decades. that would be an incredible boon to this country. instead of sending $400 billion or five order billion dollars abroad every year to buy scarce energy supplies for people who do not particularly like us, we could be spending that at home. think of the difference that will make to the economic strength of united states. think about what it will mean to job opportunities, the economic strength of america. natural gas is a very clean resources compared to many of the other options. our progress . on reducing dependence has also been on grenoble's. -- progress on reducing dependence has also been on renewables. all across north dako
education and research and development, investing in clean energy and technology, investing in infrastructure and dealing with the deficits were more -- in a more balanced way. it was about what our obligations are to each other. it was about big things. those are very, very big things. i will say that, for all of the critique about whether our campaign was about big things or not, the preoccupations of people who write about that -- and i used to do that for a living -- i don't try to separate myself -- many of them are my best friends -- there is an awful lot of horse race coverage of this presidential race. there is such a preoccupation with who will win and who will lose and so little real interest in what the implications are. >> we were talking about pulling. >> public polling is so voluminous now. any to kids with an abacus can do a poll of the corner grocery store and some national news are in position will cover it as if it is news. and maybe the billion tommy pulled him out today. -- the billy and tommy poll came out today. it can be done sound yet they produce res
to include even more families marsden -- family farms and small businesses. energy projects and to the united states are being held back by federal obstacles of all kinds and the keystone xl pipeline is hanging in the bomb -- balance because the president has refused to move forward on what should have been an easy decision for more energy and more jobs. republicans hope to work across the aisle to solve these and other critical challenges facing america in the new year. divided government is a good time to solve our problems and in the next few days, leaders in washington have a . -- an important responsibility to work together to do just that. unless the congress of president act immediately, every american will be forced to pay for the largest tax hike in our nation's history on january 1. at the same time, the federal government, including our armed forces, will undergo deep budgetary cuts. these are the cuts that president obama promise to run the campaign would never take effect. what we need to reduce spending, we can do it in a smarter way. economists not representing either political
you. host: joshua gordon, what in the year energy issues are we looking at? -- >> end of the year energy issues are we looking at? guest: i am not aware of any major ones for the fiscal cliff. going down the road, and you definitely have some issues. there is the need for a new highway bill. they have had trouble passing highly legislation because no one is willing to increase the gas tax. our gas taxes are the main way we pay for the new roads and bridges and that kind of thing. i think it is a relatively short-term problem. long term, we're going to need revenue to solve our future fiscal burden. one of the most sensible places to raise revenue would be through a carbon tax or something similar. that can also help to reorient our energy priorities to cleaner types of energy. host: i want to note that you can go to the c-span fiscal cliff website to get the latest information. you should be checking back over the next 48 hours as things develop. guest: 8 the deadline this afternoon. the senate has set a self- imposed deadline for 3:00. host: is that senator reid's plan b? guest:
did not always get it from women. find it in other places, all that helps. that is the kind of energy that was given to me. "i'm going to take a risk. i may not be perfect at it." >> do you work all the time? >> i am a morning person. >> i could be on the west coast and i am not at 5:00 a.m. and people on the west coast would say i'm crazy. i will lose the thought so why do it. i am an early riser. that was something that was instilled in us. >> is 5:00 a.m. kind of typical? >> yes. >> how late did you work? >> i tried to get in at a decent hour. as a pastime, people do not think that we do this but i like to cook. i try to eat healthy. i will do cooking of vegetables and light entrees. something i enjoy is making home cooked pinto beans. when you brought in a household where that is pretty much all you need, but now it is like a luxury. it is what you put in, the kinds of spices. it is healthy for you. >> you ran the labor department. what is the biggest work ethic for women today? >> breaking through the glass ceiling. we have about 57% of diversity in my kitchen cabinet at the dol.
again, i want to thank representative poe for the extraordinary effort and energy he's put into this bill and the way he's worked cooperatively with all of us on both sides of the aisle and madam speaker, i urge my colleagues to join me in supporting this bill and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the chair will receive a message. the messenger: madam speaker a message from the senate. the secretary: madam speaker. the speaker pro tempore: madam secretary. the secretary: i have been directed by the senate to inform the house that the nat has passed without amendment h.r. 3641, cited as the national park act. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from utah. >> i have no fufert speakers and reserve the balance -- mr. chaffetz: i have no further speakers and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from the district of columbia. ms. norton: i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from utah. mr. chaffetz: i would like to thank representative poe for introducin
a month. i am trying to go back to cornell to do sustainable energy. we are in a double down on reaganomics in despite. jimmy carter had great inflation because for five years we were a peaceful country again. then reagan put us back into the largest military buildup in peacetime. i think that's what we ought to do is realize that did not work, just like some of the new deal stuff was not working correctly. what we have to do is c- span.org [indiscernible] i want to thank mr. richard delver of the department of transportation, because unlike michael bloomberg -- host: you have gone a little bit off track, but we appreciate your comments this morning. you can see his picture on your screen. and from the new york times business section -- and from "usa today" -- that the lead this morning in "usa today." coming up, steve forbes will be here in 45 minutes to take your calls regarding issues in washington, including what we just talked about. next is lawrence yun of the national association of realtors to talk about the real estate market and how the fiscal cliff could affect it.
in there that i care deeply about. i've been the leading upon sor of extending renewable energy, for example. but what i guess is missing here in this equation is being able to actually implement the reform. i think the work that leader pelosi did, if it were focused on the bigger picture, if the administration made clear, for instance, that we were not going to have a deal unless we dealt with the debt limit, which has already been exceeded, i think there was an opportunity for us to get out of the squirrel cage that has trapped us for the last two years. i have huge respect for her efforts. it would not have passed the house were it not. she is a valuable ally and i think advisor to the president. i just think that this was an opportunity for us to go bigger and i hope that we don't miss an opportunity going forward to change how we do business. much of what we're arguing about here if we cut away the clutter and focus on how to improve government efficiency and tax fairness, is supported by the majority of the people and could find bipartisan support in congress, i think. >> one report st
was an engineer with a passion to try a lot of new stuff and i have a lot of energy. i hired people because i could not do myself what i wanted to do, and so i had employees. and i respected the work that they did because i gave them good salaries and the very best dental and health insurance, better than lockheed. and i never thought that i was there to grow a business or to make a profit. in fact, the number one thing -- and i always said that even to those who held stock in my company -- the number one thing, the biggest priority for my employees was to have fun. i enjoyed the accomplishment of breakthroughs and the fun of a first applied. and everyone who worked for me deserved to have that enjoyment. the second priority was the families of the employees have fun. that is why we provided good salaries and good health care and so on. the third priority, no cutting to make a profit. it is tough to say that to a stockholder or a board member. but every company i have ever seen go bankrupt, they started having fun -- they stop having fun before that. when people have fun, they will work like.
have those dreams. i get up every morning, with all the things the we do here, unemployment, energy problems -- when i get up in the morning, i get "the new york times," and the first place i go is the sports page. for a few minutes every morning, i dream of the athlete that i wanted to be. [laughter] and as i have dreamed over the decades, i thought, wouldn't it be great to be able to meet a babe ruth or lou gehrig? or maybe a rocky marciano? joe frazier? but today, i have been able to meet two of the people i have dreamed about going down to that 18th hole. with a good put, i can win this thing. this is a personal privilege for me to be able to meet the great jack nicklaus and to be here to help honor the great arnold palmer. we know that arnold palmer has played on the finest courses that the world has. he has designed 300 golf courses. seven of them are in nevada, operating now. he has won trophy after trophy after trophy. he has been swinging golf clubs since a little boy of four years old. he was always such a big star. i hope, arnold, you'll remember. you and winnie were trav
for businesses through an extension of important tax provisions such as the r&d credit and also renewable energy incentives that must continue in this great country of ours and encourage business investments. but i want to emphasize this somewhat in contrast to what our chairman has said. this legislation breaks the iron barrier that for far too long has prevented additional tax revenues from the very wealthiest. it raises $620 billion in revenue by achieving the president's goal of asking the wealthiest 2% of americans to pay more while protecting 98% of families -- that's right, that's what it does, 97% -- i want to emphasize this contrary to propoganda coming from the other side. 97% of small businesses from any tax increase. and this needs to be emphasized especially in view, mr. chairman, of your comments. this package is vital for future deficit reduction efforts. setting the stage for a balanced approach from here on out by delaying sequestration through one-to-one revenue to spending cuts. yesterday, president obama said he is committed to deficit reduction, but he emphasized several tim
need to do is spend our efforts and energy in trying to achieve a plan that will carry us forward. i still am optimistic we can do that. i'm hopeful that we will do it. if we don't do it in the next several weeks before the new year, i hope it is done immediately there after. i think it would be better for the country and economy and people's confidence in the act of this country to make decisions and govern wisely if we were able to make an agreement before the end of the year. and that is still possible despite the u turn from the speaker yesterday. i hope that the discussions continue and prove conclusive. with that i want to thank you for this opportunity and i'll be happy to answer questions people might have. >> we will take questions. the questions will be first from members of the media and national press club members and then if no hands are raised after that we will go to others. >> senator i want to tie some things together in terms of your great, informative powerful knowledge based so speech and ask a question that brings us into focus given current continue verse sis. y
than hers, and i saw those clothes with energy. and i get less? this is unfair. unassetable there's a difference in minimum wage and not a difference in the skills of youth. the minimum wage is 21 years and older went up by 11p but for 16 to 18 it stayed the same. is this snare this is up acceptable. this is a campaign, there needs to be a change. thank you. [applause] >> who have we got from the northwest? the northwest. massive troop of people from the northwes ha you all notpoken before? okay. what about the guy at the end? yes. right at the end with the gra suit. >> i'm daniel and i'm from the northwest. minimum wage isn't the be all end all of wages. [inaudible] young people we don't have much experience, massive unemployed people from all ages. they've got more advantage than . we have to pay -- [inaudible] >> we have to can useoo that to our advantage. thank you. >> okay. the young woman in the corner of the chamber. with flowers in her hair, leapt to her feet and has been striving regularly to contribute. now you can be heard. >> i'm from the southwest of england. we can c
] that's a very strong 27th -- 27%. i commend you on your energy. i will stop here and say there's a radical difference between the soviet-u.s. relationship and the relationship with israel and iran and you will not ask six million jews in israel to rely for their existence on deterrence in this kind of situation. thank you very much. [applause] >> if it makes you feel any better, henry kissinger didn't get away with it either. up next, dean vali nasser. the podium is yours. >> thank you. good evening. thank you for that introduction. it's a pleasure being here. let me start by saying that it goes without saying that the world would be better off if iran does not become a nuclear armed state. and achieving that goal should be our principle aim going forward. however, despite our best efforts, that undesirable end may very welcome to pass. should we act as if this is the first time that we've encountered such a challenge? or that the logical containment and deterrence somehow does not apply to iran? as iran is outside of the realm of politics as we know it. the answer is no. as tr
that the department of energy or the department of education and the number of employees they have. we do not need all that. they can cut the number of employees in half and we would have real savings. nobody will address these issues. i'll hang up. guest: when you have a budget in washington, it is hard to cut back politically. if you do, people say you are against the were the goal. this worthy goal, that worthy goal. there was a british historian in the 1950's. after world war i, britain had the largest navy in the world and they reduced the size of the navy. the laid-off sailors and dock workers. the agency running the navy was getting bigger as the navy was getting smaller. he made the discovery -- the size of a bureaucracy has nothing to do with the amount of work the bureaucracy does. it will grow unless it is reined in. the bureaucracy was getting bigger. if you get that kind of bloat, get in trouble and you change or go out of business. ronald reagan said the closest thing to immortality is a government agency. caller: good morning, everybody. do you think capitalism and privatizing is withdr
constituents in the virgin islands need relief from the highest energy cost in the country and a fair medicaid match so everyone can have access to quality health care. whatever partisan differences we have and the republicans have with our president, let's set them aside in this difficult year comes to a close an work together to give our constituents a happy new year. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from texas rise? without objection. ms. johnson: madam speaker, i rise today to implore the house g.o.p. leadership to address the looming fiscal cliff. we have only a few hours left and we owe it to the american people to find a solution. pass legislation and send it to the president for his signature tonight. there's too much at stake to let this critical situation devolve into the same politics as usual. that we have seen throughout this congress. the consequences of failure inaction are dire. according to the congressional budget office, going over the cliff would raise unemployment rate from 7.9 to 9.1% in 2013. we wou
of energy regulations are coming into effect that will cost electric costs to co-op which will affect the poor just as badly as it is the rich? host: mark from ohio, good morning. caller: all the power was taken from the epa and given to the nra. there is no fiscal cliff. there was another so-called fiscal cliff in 2008. give money to the billionaires and banks. when eisenhower took office, he gutted the military. taxes were 9% on corporations. 10 trillion dollars being horded. the problem lies and propaganda. 90% of all our information from the tv and the radio comes out of the state of texas and new york city. that is wall street. there is an economy based on military bases and nafta and oil. that is clear channel radio. time warner comes out georgia. up on the east coast, new york city is for the bankers are and insurance companies and derivatives and the jews that run the media. host: i will stop you on that point. this is from jan. some of you sharing your thoughts on our facebook page as well. one person writes -- host: join us honor twitter page or on our facebook page. rick fr
, even politically. this release the energy of the chinese people and you have this rapid economic growth. that is the story line that i will give you as to why the last.e merkeiracle and not >> go ahead. >> i thought that what by me extra time. i don't know how many of you heard the story. "the onion' declared north korea's leader the sexiest man alive. the, as party newspaper did not raise this was a satire and reprinted it straight up. this is a little bit funny. itle bit of an bi insight into the current leadership. they would not allow this kind of satirical irreverent towards their leader. they do not recognize satire when they see it. it may seem absurd you can mistake an "onion" story for a real start but they did. a fundamental flaw is you have no feedback. .hat's what is missing in china we now know that thanks to "the onion." >> i will have dambisa moyo join us. another author of several best- selling books. this year she published "winner takes all." she has been named one of the most influential people of the world by "time" magazine. [applause] >> good morning. o ye of littl
to even more family farms and small businesses. more american energy means more american jobs. unfortunately, energy projects are being held back by federal obstacles of all kinds. republicans hope to work across the aisle to solve these and other critical challenges facing america in the new year. dividing government is a good time to solve our problems. in the next few days, leaders in washington have an important responsibility to work together and do just that. unless congress and the president act immediately, every american will be forced to pay for the largest tax hike in our nation's history on january 1. at the same time, the federal government, including our armed forces and defense workers, will undergo deep, across the board budgetary cuts. these are the cuts that president obama promised during the campaign would never take effect. well we need to reduce spending, we can do it in a much smarter, more targeted way. going over the so-called fiscal cliff will lead to devastating job losses, at a time when american families and small business owners are still struggli
they are hard, because that gold will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one that we are willing to postpone, and one that we intend to win, and the others, too. [applause] many years ago, the grayish -- the great british explorer, george melroy, who was to.on mount everest, was asked what he would want to climate, and he said because it is there, and, well, space is there, and we are going to climate, and new hopes for knowledge and peace are there, and, therefore, as we set sail, we ask god's blessing on the most hazardous and dangerous and greatest adventure on which man has ever embarked. thank you. [applause] >> carol, member of the armstrong family. when president kennedy challenged us in that speech, 50 years ago today, yesterday, many thought it was an impossible dream, but the vision of that young president was rooted in the knowledge that the american experiment itself was an incredible miracle. the miracle of america was only made possible by men and women of uncommon for such, determination,
will continue to benefit from home energy programs. the bill continues funding for women infants and children, prenatal care so the week and have healthy babies and healthy moms. disabled veterans will continue to receive housing assistance. over 88,000 people in illinois will continue to receive unemployment benefits, and benefits -- businesses will benefit from consumer spending at a time when we desperately needed in our economy. let me say one last word. this is not a deficit reduction major. it does reduce it in some aspects, but the arcane scoring by the congressional budget office will not give us any credit toward deficit reduction. having said that, we still of the deficit issue. we still have a deficit problem. what we tried to establish this morning in this vote, revenue has to be part of the solution. the other side of the aisle reluctantly, after years of resisting, came to our side on this problem. number two, we need to look in entitlements. here is what the facts are. social security can make every promise of payment for 20 years. you cannot say that about any other federal pr
, in infrastructure, education, aerospace, alternative energy, research, development. the list goes on. host: that was bred in misery. next up is still, republican line, minnesota. -- phil. guest: as a republican i believe we need to pass the obama tax bill and then once we get to the ceiling of the debt we would then forced the congress to go forward with a $1 trillion debt reduction on an annual basis until it is paid off. basically, we are overspending. we have to get our debt under control. host: dan the covers it for cnn has this tweet. that is brand new from dana bash. here are some tweets from viewers using #fiscalcliff. those are some of the treats coming in. -- tweets. #fiscalcliff. caller: i have been watching what's going on in the programs and the reason i called in the first place is the debt ceiling we are now facing with sequestration that we kick the can down the road last year because they could not come up with anything and now they're going to take that down the road again and then we are coming up to another ceiling height in a few months were the debt ceiling is going to
to people -- take for example the green energy business. . -- you have hundreds of millions of dollars going to favored companies, favorable to the government because of their ideology and what they want to do. to look at the massive loss and waste, and there are criminal investigations into some of these operations -- not only is it an horribly unfair way of redistributing hard-earned income, but it does not work. these companies are laying people off and shutting down, and in some cases i saw were a couple of these big companies, the chinese have come in and bought them and have taken the equipment back to china. what that amounts to is we gave china a leg up by building the company, and when it goes bankrupt we have to handed over to china, as if they do not have enough advantage is. host: chester, pa., karen. caller: happy new year, and thank you for c-span. the original stimulus money went to the banks, and the banks would not lend, so everybody suffered. then george bush gave everyone a stimulus in their hand, they went to walmart to spend it, and the chinese still got it. then, the bu
. the democrats have politics and legislation. it is not in our genes to put a whole bunch of energy in getting the republican party. we've not learned how to do that yet, i don't think. i like being a democrat for that reason. >> one of the things we hear from long-term members or members who are leaving is the congeniality here has changed. what is your view? >> person-to-person, you know what our elevators are like here. the public probably doesn't but we get squished and it is fun. there's humor and there is a lot of banter and people don't dislike each other, period. but you get off that elevator and it changes. when i first got here, people were -- the thing that surprised me was how polite, how respectful everybody was to everybody no matter what party you were, no matter what the issue was. it was very respectful. so you could carry on real conversations that over the years it has gotten -- it is just not. that's been a huge disappointment. >> our research shows that you are spoken on the floor, given 400-plus speeches. >> almost 450. >> in the house of representatives, why do you use t
saw all too clearly in the devastating ways with energy communication and transportation systems in the aftermath of sandy, interconnectivity represents enormous intersecting opportunities and intersecting vullnerbleses -- vulnerabilities with cascading consequences. predict the left of -- level of these networks will grow rapidly in the next year and beyond. and if we are able to take advantage of the ubiquity of data, the interconnectivity of data and things and powerful new analytical and computational tools to stay ahead of the curve, the future is ours. but there may be questions about the value of new digital information. so i further predict that because of the ability to gain new information and insights from data and implicitly the ability to marry data with things, new economic models will emerge around data driven information and innovation, both data at rest and data at motion and there will be growing and new tensions and conflicts around the modernization of data, particularly with respect to ownership, privacy, and security. but we have to ask questions of whether
politics and legislation. it is not in our genes to put a whole bunch of energy in getting the republican party. we've not learned how to do that yet, i don't think. i like being a democrat for that reason. >> one of the things we hear from long-term members or members who are leaving is the congeniality here has changed. what is your view? >> person-to-person, you know what our elevators are like here. the public probably doesn't but we get squished and it is fun. there's humor and there is a lot of banter and people don't dislike each other, period. but you get off that elevator and it changes. when i first got here, people were -- the thing that surprised me was how polite, how respectful everybody was to everybody no matter what party you were, no matter what the issue was. it was very respectful. so you could carry on real conversations that over the years it has gotten -- it is just not. that's been a huge disappointment. >> our research shows that you are spoken on the floor, given 400-plus speeches. >> almost 450. >> in the house of representatives, why do you use that platform an
: this follow-up -- if you are poor, you'd have to spend a lot of energy to get enough to beat. john, connecticut. good morning. caller: good morning. i was calling to mention low- quality food and the cost of health care, but you covered well. do you think it would be more beneficial if they start doing a local farming program where they could start growing vegetables? maybe have some land with tiles and chickens, and local people could work on the farming areas and return the food to the communities as opposed to being so reliant on high-salt diets, the foods we would coin as having a long shelf life, leaving it on the shelf for six months without going bad? has the government been able to look into those programs, considering the finances involved in the program as a whole? host: thank you. a related topic -- the availability of this fresh produce is a big distraction for many. guest: there are some programs that speak directly to the point, one our farms-to-school programs, directed to help know where food is coming from and getting fresher food into the schools. in addition, we
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)